Insights

Web push notifications aren’t perfect—and they’re not for every situation, or even every brand. So go in with your eyes wide open—the tools that marketing, growth, and engagement teams use to communicate with their audiences don’t exist in a vacuum, and no one tool is a perfect fit for every situation.

Web push notifications aren’t perfect—and they’re not for every situation, or even every brand.

Like traditional push notifications early in their existence as a channel, web push notifications by and large are built for a very particular kind of communication: namely, short and sweet text-focused messages that provide value by keeping customers up to speed and in the loop on key, time-sensitive updates. And while the version of web push supported by Apple’s desktop Safari browser can support decent-sized pictures, we’re a long way from web push being the ideal channel for communicating highly-visual messages to your audience.

Beyond those constraints, there’s another issue that can hamstring brands when it comes to their use of web push notifications—like traditional push notifications, this channel requires users to affirmatively opt-in to receive messages. Looking to make that happen? At Braze, we strongly recommend that brands planning to leverage web push notifications make use of the OTHER major web messaging channel, in-browser messages, to prime web visitors to opt into web push, in much the same way brands are already priming app users for traditional push. Check out this guide to get instructions for doing so using Braze.

Now, while these downsides are real, they don’t invalidate the significant value that web push can provide when used thoughtfully. But go in with your eyes wide open—the tools that marketing, growth, and engagement teams use to communicate with their audiences don’t exist in a vacuum, and no one tool is a perfect fit for every situation.

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Todd Grennan

Todd Grennan is a New York-based writer and editor. When he's not writing about mobile marketing, customer retention and emerging technologies for Braze, you can find him trying to read his way through every Wikipedia article related to World War II.